I had such an overwhelming response on our Fun with Feet blog last week, I couldn’t help but want to share more with you.

I thank all of you for your comments and emails regarding how interesting it was to read and because you asked for more…..here it is.

I so often hear, in fact just the other day….”I could never work in a Business of feet”….”yucky yuck”.

I shouldn’t, but I do take offense to that statement because the Business of feet is so highly under-estimated.  So many people have the mis-conception that working with feet is ALL bad.  Well, I’m here to tell you it is not.  In fact, working with feet is very rewarding.

Not only do we have the opportunity to make people look better through the process of pedicuring. We also have the opportunity to help them feel better, through the process of pedicuring.

In addition, we have the opportunity to help them understand the importance of their feet and how our feet carry us around for a lifetime.

So, if someone tells YOU they could never do what you do.  Say “Thank you”.  We are a rare breed who don’t just look at feet for the sake of Pedicuring.  We look at feet to help people, change their lives and introduce them to a whole new world of how we have advanced in so many areas when it comes to the education of feet.

Let’s get some more education that you can share.  Let’s have some “FUN WITH FEET”

Babylonian pedicure

Pedicuring nails can date back 4,000 years. It is said noblemen from Babylonian used solid gold tools to give themselves manicures and pedicures.

The use of fingernail polish can be traced back even further. As early as 3000 BC, in China nail color indicated one’s social status.  Royal fingernails were painted black and red. All the way back to 2300 BC, the Egyptians (who earn the credit for inventing pedicures) have been manicuring & pedicuring.  They too used Ruby red as an indication or royal status.

Did you know also?  In ancient Egypt and Rome, military commanders polished their nails to match their lips before they went into battle?

 

Did you know there were superstitions about cutting your nails?  Yup…no joke!

A passage from an article about superstitions was posted in the Boston Globe in 1889

“It is unlucky to cut the finger nails on Friday, Saturday or Sunday. If you cut them on Friday you are playing into the devil’s hand; on Saturday, you are inviting disappointment, and on Sunday, you will have bad luck all week.

There are people who suffer all sorts of gloomy forebodings if they absentmindedly trim away a bit of nail on any of these days and who will suffer all the inconvenience of overgrown fingernails sooner than cut them after Thursday.”

stephan-henning-_SMNO4cN9vs-unsplash

Speaking of cutting fingernails.  the nail clipper wasn’t always a “thing”.

It’s not really clear who invented the modern fingernail clipper, however patents started to appear for fingernail trimmers around 1875.

We do know if you’ve ever used a paring knife to peel an apple, that’s how fingernails were cut before there was a designated tool for it, whether using an actual knife or small scissors. 

Lets look at a couple early designs of “fingernail cutting tools”

It’s so interesting to me, when we look back at the history of nails, many things seems so archaic, or are they?  Red nail polish is still red nail polish.  The tools have improved of course, but there are some very basic similarities.  There were specialist then and there are specialist now.

As I write this, I am reminded of a commercial where there are 2 men standing on one side of a cliff, watching a man on a horse coming towards them from the other side of the cliff.  The one man say’s “if only he had something to get across”.  Well, there was no “bridge” and the man and the horse fall into the crevice of the cliff.

Ideas come, they go. However someone at sometime invents and creates tools needed to solve a problem.  And, over time, those tools are perfected.

The problems of feet have always been there.  The tools have always been there.  They have just through the progression of time, been perfected.

CJ Murray, President Centre For Beauty

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