This past week I posted a one(1) line statement on Facebook. “WHAT HAPPENED TO RESPECT?”

The comments posted solidified my point. Many of them went directly to politics, criticizing and accusing our President of causing the lack of respect in our Country. The post was NOT at all politically motivated.

Let me share a little insight into my mind;

I began thinking about someone I know recently who just got married. A month prior to the wedding their was a bridal shower. My husband and I sent a gift. We have yet to receive a thank you note (now about 6 weeks later)

From that thought in my mind, it brought me to times visiting my folks when my nieces and nephews were present. They were young and restless. I recalled how they ran around the house and went into the refrigerator without asking. Mind you, growing up my siblings and I NEVER opened the refrigerator to get something to eat, without asking our parents first.

From that thought, I recalled the days of my siblings and I, very young visiting my Grand Mother. We literally sat on her couch (all 7 of us), hands folded with our mouths shut. If we were to move an inch….we got “the look”.

These thoughts is what brought me to posting that one line statement on Facebook.

Social media

Unfortunately, social media has brought out dis-respect in amounts I can’t even fathom.

It’s no surprise as I know it’s easy to hide behind a keyboard. It’s easy to make derogatory, discriminatory, nasty, hurtful comments when not speaking face to face.

Some people call it bullying, I call it spineless.

 

The lack of respect I see on social media surprisingly isn’t just in our younger generation. All generations are guilty of these actions.

What I find most alarming is the quickness to place blame on someone else being the cause of “why someone is disrespectful”.  So, let me get this clear. Because you think our Government (as an example) is the cause for dis-respect, it allows you to be dis-respectful as well? It justifies your actions?

Respect is an individual thing. Characteristics of respect are;

  • Be polite.
  • Act respectfully.
  • Listen well.
  • Be helpful.
  • Don’t make excuses.
  • Let go of anger.
  • Be willing to change.

 

Be polite Actrespectfully Listen well Be helpful Don't make excuses Let go of anger Be willing to change

When I think about respect within our Salons, I’m reminded of simple things.

  • I’m reminded of the time’s I’ve arrived for my appointment on time, and my Technician was running late
  • I’m reminded of my Technician texting and looking at her phone, during my entire appointment time
  • I’m reminded my Technician having conversation with everyone in her Salon except me
  • I’m reminded of not being asked pertinent questions regarding my likes and dislikes

Does any of the above show lack of respect?

Many of you know, my husband has joined the Centre For Beauty team as our warehouse lead.

This has been a new experience for him as well as a new experience for he and I as husband and wife working together. We both have to remember to be respectful of each other, after all…don’t we hurt the ones we love the most?

Even more than that though, I am so happy my husband has the same attitude I do when it comes to our clients. Be it large or small, all are treated equally. We both respect all our clients based on the fact they are clients, not on the size of their orders.

This should hold true in our Salons as well. Are you treating a now and then client the same way you treat your staple clients whom reserve multiple services?

My sole purpose of focusing on the Nail Technician with my Business was based on the lack of respect I personally received as a Nail Technician from most of the rep’s in this industry.

I know this is not the first time I’ve shared my story regarding being ignored by full service reps of a Distributor because I was a Nail Technician and not a hair stylist.

The experience still bewilders me. I’ve always been of the mindset it isn’t just about where someone is today, it’s about how we can help them grow for the future.

When it comes to our Salon clients, we cannot take them for granted. It doesn’t matter whether they spend $25.00 on a basic manicure or $90.00 on a massage. We must at all times follow the 7 characteristics of respect, regardless of who that person is.

Lets review the 7 characteristics of respect as it relates to our Salons

  • Be polite – do you acknowledge all your clients as they walk in the door? Or, are you ignoring them until you are ready to service them?
  • Act respectfully – look the part, act the part, be the part.
  • Listen well – do you just hear what they say, or are you truly listening?
  • Be helpful – don’t just give your clients what they want, suggest what you know, as a trained Professional might be best for them.
  • Don’t make excuses – I’m sorry….only goes so far. Actions are louder than words.
  • Let go of anger – anger is a feeling which can be controlled. It can also be felt by others.
  • Be willing to change – one of the things I learned in my training of Oncology care is how to master the secrets of empathy. The first secret is modification.

In my final thoughts on this topic, I wish to make a personal plea.

My parents taught us, “think before you speak”.  When posting on social media we have to “pause before we send”.

It is imperative everyone realizes, the image of our industry isn’t just seen in our Salons, it’s seen wherever our voices are heard (or read).

Changing the image of our Industry requires discipline. It requires all the 7 characteristics of respect!

CJ Murray, President

CJ Murray
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