It's crazy. Inspiration can come from anywhere. When talking with my husband regarding the topic of my next blog, I was stuck. Everything that was going through my mind related back to my last article. I didn't want to write about the same thing, but my brain wasn't settling on anything that interest me. If I can't interest myself, I can't interest you.

You may have seen on my personal FB page last week, we had a very traumatic incident with our 9 year old boxer, Maddie. She choked on a bully stick. We know she died. I'm going to leave the details out about how we know, and share with you, she is fine. My husband was able to pull the bully stick out of her throat, opening her passage to breath. It was the most frightening experience, surreal and a true test of not only how the grace from God, but how the 2 of us acted or really we reacted, in the event of an emergency.

So, as I was discussing my next article with my husband, I was staring at our precious Maddie and thinking about what would have happened if we weren't quick thinking in our actions to save our dog whom, we had no idea at first......what was wrong.

This made my mind wonder into our Salon environment. We know NOT to cut the skin of a Diabetic. We know NOT to massage someone with Fibromyalgia or circulatory problems. However, do we know what to do if........one of our services has gone bad?
WHY?

It's true isn't it?  When I think back of all the classes I have taken, not a one of them address the "what if's?"

Its easy to teach

  • Why we shouldn't use implements on a diabetic
  • Why someone with neuropathy shouldn't have their feet in hot water
  • Why we shouldn't massage a client who has had a lymph node removed
  • Why if a client has thin skin, water and a massage can damage them
  • Why we shouldn't service someone with fungus
  • Why why why?  We have heard it all.

However, addressing circumstances which happen in our Salon which, can be life changing, is something not many have discussed.

  • Have you ever continued with a service after your client felt discomfort from your Efile?
  • Have you ever continued a service after you nipped someone with your cuticle nippers. Enough to draw blood?
  • Have you ever hurt someone during a massage?

These and many more can happen in your Salons.  Would you know how to manage?

WHY?-3

About 2 years ago, I was hired by an Attorney to provide State Law information for a client she was defending.  Her client had gone into a nail salon for a set of artificial nails.  The Technician, using an Efile burned her.

She pulled her hand back and he gave her a love tap.  "It will be okay he say's, just give it a minute."

She gave it a minute and the pain did go away, however the indent he caused in her nail which was red.....did not.

Within a couple of weeks she felt pain and had swelling.  Long story short, she attempted to get treated for it, but it wasn't going away.  By the time they realized what was going on.....they had to amputate her whole finger because the infection had gone through to the bone.

What went wrong?

What went wrong is the lack of knowledge and professionalism from the Technician.

  • No love tap here.....geez Louise Really?
  • He should have an antiseptic product at his station.  Cleanse the nail and apply.
  • He should also have sent his client home with an at home antiseptic.
  • He should NEVER have gone over the nail with any primer nor any artificial nail enhancement product, be it acrylic or gels.
  • He should have scheduled a 1 week appointment to look at it and assess any progression.
  • He should have a referral program in place to refer his client to a Medical Professional for extra precautions.

His lack of knowledge and professionalism cost him thousands of dollars from the suit the client filed for causing the infection which caused her to lose her finger.

In addition, a conversation was started on the lack of cleaning and/or proper cleaning and disinfection within the Salon which then, caused the State to get involved.

What about the client who got nipped during the Pedicure service, happens to be diabetic and the Technician ignored it and placed his feet back in the water.

BAD things can happen!

Placing a diabetic or anyone back in the water after an accidental cut can be horrific.

  • Clients can get very bad infections from open wounds
  • I've seen clients who have been scarred for life because the infection was so difficult to manage.
  • I've seen clients who have had their foot amputated because the infection was so bad.

What should we do in this type of situation?

  • Do NOT place that foot back in the water
  • Do NOT continue the service
  • Apply an antiseptic to stop the bleeding
  • Instruct the client his/her at home care.  Continue with an antiseptic, keep the area clean.
  • Schedule a follow up appointment in a week to stay abreast of it's "hopeful" healing.
  • Refer to a Medical professional if needed

What about a client who goes into shock or has a mini stroke in the middle of your service?  I hate to even think I have to say this....STOP THE SERVICE.

  • Call 911 immediately

That's it!  Do NOT attempt to do anything.

What about toenail fungus or foot fungus? Do you even know how to tell?

The reality is, if we turned down every client who had discoloration on her/his toenails.....we would be broke? However, how do you know?

We can't diagnose

We can't treat

What we can do is recognize, recommend and refer!

Knowledge is power. The more you know how to visibly identify different toenail and foot conditions, the more comfortable you AND your client will be.

Letting your client know "this is indicative" of a fungus and knowing you should not pedicure her/him.....is hard. However, I'm 100% sure your client will have the utmost respect for you AND you have for sure protected yourself from a law suit waiting to happen.

Refer. Build you community of resources. Put them in your emergency manual.

Don't be afraid to walk away.

And, the client who stops breathing for any reason.  Whether it be from something you did in your service, or natural causes?

  • Call 911 immediately
  • Do you have anyone on your staff that knows CPR? If not, maybe you should

The bottom line is, its' time we realize there are many many things which can happen to us in a day at our Salon.  We need to be ready!

  • Do you have an emergency kit on premises?  The basics, aspirin, bandages, gauze, peroxide etc.
  • Do you have an antiseptic at your station?
  • Do you have proper cleaning and disinfection procedures in place?
  • Do you have an actual written manual on emergency procedures, phone #'s of your local hospital, emergency clinic, police etc.?
  • Is anyone on your team CPR trained?
  • Is your entire team aware of your procedures.

We were fortunate.  Our Maddie girl situation had a happy ending.

We finally realized she was choking and just knew we had to get what was lodged in her throat out of it.

If I told you however, we did all this calmly.....that would be a lie.  We both were screaming for our Maddie not to die.  We both were shaking like crazy and we both felt like our world was crashing.

The lesson I learned?

  • Never ever give your dog bully sticks
  • Have the phone # to your very posted somewhere in addition to your phone
  • Have your closest emergency clinic phone # posted somewhere in addition to your phone

We learned some hard lessons....maybe this article will help at least 1 person to produce an emergency manual.  For your benefit and the benefit of your clients.

CJ Murray, President